About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 158
Book TV 137
Today 76
Hannity 69
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 577
MSNBCW 515
CNNW 393
SFGTV2 378
SFGTV 362
FBC 329
KGO (ABC) 313
ALJAZAM 290
CSPAN2 274
CSPAN 243
MSNBC 214
KPIX (CBS) 210
FOXNEWS 206
KNTV (NBC) 174
CNBC 170
CNN 166
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 6352
Spanish 76
French 15
Korean 3
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 6,471 (some duplicates have been removed)
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
anything is possible in obama's america. greg? >> andy, can you blame people in obama's america not wanting to run with the bulls? >> i am just surprised the bulls want to come here what with obamacare and all. >> exactly. >> and you can only use 49 bulls in assisted of 50. >> i think there are 58 bulls. >> eight won't be eligible for health care. >> enough of this. look who is here. she is so british her blood type is marmalade. i am here #w* imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries" and if hilarity was a soap dispenser they would pump him in the office bathroom. he is writer examine comedian jake fogelnest. bill schulz is out of town and filling in is my nude rock climbing instructor, michael moynahan. glad you combed your hair. and he is not allowed within 50 feet of a hot air balloon. next to me, america's future foundation. that's not magestic. camille foster. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. get ready for an hour's worth of tmi. >> will he be less graby after time and rehaby? well san diego mayor bob filner has started two weeks of intensive the
to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>. >> john: myth number five, our drinking water is in danger because oil companies frack. what is that? >> controversy is over chemicals being injected into the earth to break up rock and release natural gas. >> john: it means shoving chemicals into the ground to frack the rock to release oil and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficientn energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels lke you are pumping stuff into mother ea
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
, invention, life. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> welcome back. we're keeping an eye on the gang violence that has taken over some chicago neighborhoods in our special series. but chicago is by no means the only ci
and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these banned weapons by this regime is something that the obama administration absolutely must react to. again, i don't think the obama administration is interested in leading the american people into a long-term war, nor does anyone in the obama administration really believe that airstrikes will somehow embolden or sustain the opposition, the rebel sources such that they could somehow march on damascus and throw assad out. so i think
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
and every one of us, in unity, in unison, letting those who say that they managed this country of america know that it is the people. it is the voice and the actions of the people that say, we must overcome, and eventually say, we have overcome, because of the involvement of each and everyone. that is our challenge today. let us move for and do what we must do, remembering freedom is not free. we must work for it. [applause] >> peaceful coexistence was a hallmark of dr. king's teachings. he said we must learn to get to live as brothers or perish as fools. welcome the rev. christian stone, and the president of asian american advancing justice. >> greetings from the fellowship of reconciliation, working since 1915 to secure a world of justice and freedom from through nonviolence. today, 50 years after the march on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a
were killed. those are the headlines at this hour. america tonight is up next. you can get the latest news online at al jazeera.com. i will see you at 11:00 eastern time. >> on america tonight, now it's all in the timing. washington sends its firmest signals yet that it intends to act. >> they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. >> back to school and adding up the risks. chicago students seek safe passage to class. >> it be glasses on the floor and the drugs. you have to walk through all of that danger and it's very carry. >>> also tonight, losing control. a burst of heat threatens to fuel a new round of california wildfires. ♪ >>> and good evening, thanks for being with us, i'm joie chen. while the timing remains a mystery, the white house laid down some clear markers about the actions against syria. both president obama and his chief diplomat, secretary of state john kerry had high confidence that the syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people and set fairly clear guidelines in place about how it intends to
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
in america but in the entire world, we need to know more about the world. so often we find the world knows more about us than we know about them. when i got to tanzania in 1970 i recall talking to a kid who was 14 years old, is name was godfrey and he approached me in the street and started talking to me about thomas jefferson and jeffersonian democracy and i was stunned because there were teachers i knew and americans generally you couldn't find tanzania on a matter. they know more about you than you know about them. that is sad. exceptionalism has cost us knowledge of much of the world. one can liken it to your years in high school when you knew the kids who finished ahead of you but you can't remember anybody in the class behind you. we happen to think people because they are for or less important, a sad state to be in. >> host: with all due respect, i think your words further in title many blacks to find excuse instead of getting to work and doing better. we all have our injustices' to overcome. you are speaking of 200 years ago. is >> guest: let me use human rights language. say the c
much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had little choice. he had been summoned to court. prosecutors were ready to indict
. >>> thanks for watching. i am del walters. america tonight is next. we begin with america tonight. [ sirens ] >> we have a male black, blue hat, jersey and blue jeans, he was last seen going southbound. >> 15 years old. going southbound. >> it's like no other place in the united states. the heat, the intensity. the militarization. and the shear level of violence can often feel like a combat zone. in chicago, 72 people were shot, 12 killed. >> he was shot multiple times. >> in 2012, chicago led the nation with 500 people murdered. that's almost 100 more than killed in new york, a city three times its size. >> every single corner in that neighborhood is a drug corner. every single one of the. >> mike shield is a veteran cop who used to work chicago's west side. he's a curled member of the police officers' union. >> how would you describe chicago to people who don't know about it. >> it's almost like you're in a different country. it's almost like a third world. i know nationally people are talking when chicago, but the areas where the gun violence is going on isn't an area that a tourist woul
with the president. and that day, i'll tell you, our work paid off. people came from all over america. some americans living abroad flew home to participate in the march. people came from almost every state, people from idaho, wyoming, montana, church groups, labor groups, student groups, just plain, everyday individuals. >> rose: and what did your heart say to you when you heard martin luther king say, "i have a dream?" >> when martin luther king jr. got to that place in that speech and said, "i have a dream today, a dream deeply rooted in the american dream," i knew he was preaching and he was really preaching. he knew it himself. he turned those marble steps of the lincoln memorial into a modern day pulpit and the crowds were with him. jackson did a song how we got over, how we got over, and the whole place just rocked and rocked. >> rose: let me give you some timeline. april 16, dr. king writes his famous letters from a birmingham jail, and responded to white alabama ministers who urged him to end the demonstration. on june 12 medgar edgars was assassinated. what did you end that day with that yo
of america. residents.or 600,000 forth thatt it go this is not only a commemoration of continuation. but what you have here are two generations that have come together and there is a lot said about the joshua generation. the younger people. them, it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side-by-side together and so let this be a date in which moses points the way for joshua the walls of segregation of racism and materialism come tumbling down. our that, let me introduce irst speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, dr. michael shank. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity. we glorify killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire at weapons. we honor the wielders of force. we excuse those willing to build their lives on the shattered dreams of other. there is another violence just a
to another regardless whether it's america's cup or not are there improvements we could be doing while studying and figure out the longer term solutions as the projects are coming along and the longer term as well? >> yes president, yes and you're chewing gum and able to blow bubbles and we're seeing the bubbling up of ideas we're implementing this summer and for instance with the america's cup there are improvements that we started. i always like to link the america's cup planning with this assessment and there is no difference for the large event and what we need to do for the long haul. we are using these pilot projects how to run the e line service and see it running more because of the service from mission bay to the wharf and the bicycle lanes painted green is a brilliant idea and i checked it out and people are using the lanes in bigger numbers and no longer on the sidewalks. >> and they're stopping at the signals. that's the best part. >> that's the bubble blown and chewing gum. >> people are running in them and they're minding the traffic and i don't know about green compar
-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> senator mark pryor is joining us this week on "the communicators." your full committee recently approved tom wheeler to the sec. senator cruz,, has talked about putting a hold on that nomination. any word on that right now? >> we are working on that. the may 1 say, thank you for having me on. people in arkansas to watch c- span lot, i want to thank c-span for what they do. back to the tom wheeler nomination, basically there is sentiment within the senate that we ought to repair this with the republican nominee. have acans would like to republican to go alongside the process. the problem is the we have not thecially released republican name that they want nominated. hopefully we will get this done quickly and senator rockefeller has said this publicly that he wanted to expedite that. my view is that you do not have to pare them. it ink that if we can do such a way that it does not , it will beme protracted and i would go ahead to try to get tom wheeler on. >> one of the co
>> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you are in, working for new captain. we offer sexe tees and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington. demonstrators gather outside an israeli prison where 26 palestinians are released just before peace talks are scheduled to start. former u.s. president bill clinton sits down with the bbc offering his view on america's struggle to feigned an alternative solution in syria. >> sometimes you are not going to win them all. >> doing nothing is better than something sometimes. >> sometimes. not always, but in this case i think yes. >> and a fireworks show brought to you by mother nature. many look
. ♪ mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot >>> welcome back to "inside story." nasa scientists say the destructive power of these fires is here to stay and will likely get worse. earlier i spoke with nasa scientist douglas morton and asked him about how this current season fits
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington. i am kathy k. former egyptian leader hosni mubarak is free and out of resin only two years after being deposed. >> this is depressingly symbolic at a time when the security reborn, theto be man who resided over it has been released from prison. >> as pressure mounts to allow united nations inspectors into the site of yesterday's alleged chemical attack, we investigate the evidence in syria. she sings and she dances and she acts. tonight, she talks about a life that has seen its share of ups and downs. our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. hosni mubarak served two years of a life sentence in prison before he was released today. the former egyptian president was flown by helicopter out of jail. to the hospital he is held under house arrest. he still faces charges of complicity in the killing of tahrir square protesters. >> supporters celebrate the turning back of the clock. many celebrated his removal but two years of turmoil have made many egyptians nostalgic. >> hosni mubarak was the best. and weere the be
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you a pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt don features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono starte
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. ♪ [ cheers ] content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary,
, and our community is hotly debating the state of black women in america. >> yeah, and the stream he only tackle light hearted topics, like race. and of course our unopinioned audience has their feedback. so you the viewer at home. we know you have opinions on this subject. we know it. and out there this show be sure to join the discussion, because you are the third host of the show, by tweeting us. >> black power is for black men. recently that hashtag sparked debate across the country. black women used it to show how they are left out of the community. we talked with civil rights leader gloeshia richardson about the march on washington. she actually spoke there, and she was added to the program at the march on washington following a lot of criticism that women aren't invited. >> they called the women very late in the march, as least as far as i was concerned. i understand that ann arnold hedgeman has fought to have women represented. >> so she said she realized the role of women at the march wasn't what it seemed. >> they had a separate place for women to march from. i was left in the t
. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you are pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these chemicae ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt damon features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono started artists against fracking. and so is the left wing media. >> it comes
and demand. america produces 10 million barrels of oil a day. we consume double that, but globally the world produces and uses 89 million barrels of oil a day, and 30% of that comes from the middle east. so it's oil traders, speculators who are to blame for driving up the price of oil. this week right now there is absolutely no supply problem on oil. today on twitter and facebook i've been asking you how would a spike in gas prices change your spending habits? on facebook canner ara writes, there would absolutely be less money for groceries and going out. the discretionary spending that supports my economy takes the first hit. this viewer said i would have to find a new job. i already have taken a pay cut and i'm low on cash now. the commute would exacerbate the costs. tweet us or leave us a question on facebook. maybe these increasing oil prices b which by the way has st this country in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfun
. but it is forecast growth of 2.5%, still better than america's with 2%. let me give you more context. some better context. take a look at thea chylosis in dollars. the next five biggest economies cannot compete with america's size. china is growing much faster but the u.s. economy is almost double china's size. america's economy will almost never grow that fast, because of more mature economy typically doesn't. today we have been asking you how do you measure your personal growth. i looic this one from mike. he says by how much i can borrow. >> this viewer seems to agree. an increase means little if i can't keep up with costs. tell me what you think by tweeter@aj real money or leave us a comment on facebook. what was the biggest driver of the growth in this country. it was exports. exports account for almost 14% of our nation'sgdp. and ships this emto places like brazil and bermuda. david joins us now from his home, good to see you, sir, thank you for being with us. tell us a little about what you were -- what your business was before you discovered exports? well, it is a pleasure to talk to you.
, america is losing the battle against mary jane. this year new hampshire and illinois legalized medical marijuana bringing the to 20 the number of states where your pharmacist will soon look like this. (laughter) the dude prescribes. (laughter) and folks, the war on nugs used to have a strong ally on cnn's dr. sanjay gupta who opposed legalizing pot until now. >> i want to remind you that in 2009 you wrote a "time" magazine article entitled why i would vote no on pot. you changed your mind. >> i have. and as part of, you know, my thinking, the reason, i have apologized for some of the earlier reporting because i think, you know, we've been terribly and systemically mislead in this country for some time. and i did part of that misleading. >> stephen: wait a second, we were misinformed by a cable news doctor? (laughter) next you'll tell me i can't get directions to my cousin's house from fareed zakaria's gps. come on fareed, less on syria, more on how i get to where greg lives. (laughter) it's bad enough that is an jay gupta or as i now call him ganja soupta, okay-- (laughter) a global, g
know, but what we do now. it's a question of american resolve, and america's place in the world. >> our concern with the cause of the defenseless people of syria, is about choices that will directly affect our role in the world and our interests in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully, but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. this crime against conscious, this crime against humanity, this crime against the most fundamental principles of international community, against the norm of the international community, this matters to us. >> and a little while after that, president obama spoke at the white house ahead of a meeting with balkan leaders -- pardon me, baltic leaders. he said there's no open-ended commitments being discussed. there's no american boots on the ground in syria. he did not make a decision but he did express that he wished the international community had already acted and lamented the fact that
in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with incomes between 30, $50,000 a year have internet connections at home but that number is even lower with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home, and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live because it is just not available and hasn't been billed out to their areas of that is the picture. >> host: how did we get here? it seems that the the internet started
struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thought the -- sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace and equality. we must embrace that love and cease the violence. no more senseless newtown or columbines, no more daily killings of our young people by our young people on the streets of chicago and countless neighborhoods across the country. we need more gun control but we also need more love. yes, we all need love for each other, blarks white, and yellow, red and brown, gay and straight, christians muslims and jews. and all of god's children loving one another. we must embrace love and hold on to that powerful spiritual which inspired my father's generation and inspires us still today. we aren't going to let nobody turn us around. we aren't going to let n
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
and other opportunities that we're all hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. so recent studies have shown that throughout the united states, but also in iowa, that all growth in work force in the next 30 years will be attributable to immigrants, because of this demographic of retiring baby boomers and the generation coming after them. and of course also as i think senator harkin alluded to, we also need to not only fill jobs that are are currently here, but we need to create jobs, we need known vagues. and this is where immigrants have really contributed to america as well. immigrants are are more likely as a group to start businesses. immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they are working in the high tech industries and that, than native born counterparts. then finally we have to remember that we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from the rest of the world. and that's true for our economy. so therefore our economy is not a zero sum game, our work force is not a zero sum game. businesses and workers adapt to changing policies and changing circumstances.
news at the top of every hour. thanks for watching. [[voiceover]] there's more to america. more stories. more voices. more points of view. >>from our headquarters in new york ... [[voiceover]] now there's a news channel with more of what americans want to know. >>i'm ali velshi, and this is real money. >>this is america tonight. >>our news coverage, reporting, and documentaries explore, inspire, and reveal more of america's stories. >>i'm here to investigate genetically modified salmon. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >>a. >> >> >>> we were just talking about consumer confidence, a big one-day drop in the stock market may not erode your confidence in this economy, but a big oil spike will. stocks tumbled on tuesday with the dow closing down more than 170 points for the d
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
to focus on. the other thing you haven't mentioned yet which is critical is rural america. you mentioned we had a hearing on rural america. the economics of rural america really haven't changed. it's just like back in the old days we couldn't get electricity in rural america. they couldn't get telephone service and a lot of this is changing. there is a lot of change in this world and we just made -- need to make sure that rural america is not left out. >> guest: i drove home to michigan this week and i couldn't help but knows precisely what you are referring to which is the cell phone coverage varies greatly and obviously the rural areas are the areas where it is not a strong. what can be done about this? we do have things -- shifted to wireless but most of it is going towards wired rodkin so what can be done in the wireless space? >> guest: well this is something i think the fcc has grappled with and the house and senate have grappled with this. i don't think we have a clear answer in terms of a clear consensus but a lot of what we talk about here is money. the economics of providing rural
. this is "your money." only in america can you grow talent like this. we like to think of america as innovation nation. but the numbers reveal a slogan that should read, "part-time america." >>> call it the do you want fries with that economy? part-time jobs have exploded, nearly doubling since 2007. 8.2 million americans who would rather have a full-time job punching the time clock part-time instead. president obama admits there is more work to do, but is his signature achievement, obamacare, partly to blame? >> more companies have said because of this law they'll have to shift full-time workers to part-time. >> reporter: team retailer now the latest company demoting some full-time workers to part-time not because of obamacare, it's just good business. the teamsters sending a letter to world leaders saying they could destroy the foundation of the 40-hour work week that is the backbone of america middle class. a middle class in trouble with 14,000 other americans forced to take part-time gigs since march. whatever the reason, the numbers don't lie. is america becoming a nation of part-timers? t
in school innovation and a small grant with each for america, the partner was in similar ways that we are doing with the other schools with the new teacher center around building capacity, to support and retain, our highly qualified teachers. and so this is a non-traditional, very small contract with tfa that actually is about helping us change the paradyme, the tsa board asked me to come and speak on richard's behalf, probably six or seven months ago and talked about how they want to shift the relationship that they have with the districts from just staffing people with tsa teachers to really looking at how they can be a supportive partner around all of the leadership development activities for the teachers and this was an opportunity for us with the sales force grant, who also really wanted to promote the partnership work and look at different ways of partnering with tsa and who does have an interest in our school district and being a partner, but in a different way than they have in the past. so we felt, the superintendent and i, and others working on this felt that this was a good
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 6,471 (some duplicates have been removed)